Sunday, October 08, 2017

Retun to the Dolomites

The plan David Brooksbank and I had agreed to was to climb the Weisshorn. This had been the previous years plan too. The problem is "Weiss" in German means white. The guide book states that an ascent is a considerable undertaking when the ridge is covered in snow. It follows that the best conditions are when the Weisshorn is not white [which is not often.] Just prior to David's arrival the Weisshorn was in good climbing condition- not white. But the week before his arrival the mountain resorted to its default setting. Partly because it was late in the season and partly because there had been so much snow , the guardian packed his bags and headed down to the valley. In fact not only was the Weisshorn covered in snow but it became very apparent that most of the big mountains in the western alps were out of condition, plus the weather forecast was only good for the next two days, then it was due to be horrible. We decided to make the most of the two days of good weather and started by rock climbing on the glaciated slabs above the Mer de Glace. A more spectacular place to go rock climbing is hard to find . Beautiful autumn sunshine and not a soul in sight. Friday 22nd September. The idea for the day was to climb the east ridge of the Aiguille Van high above the Emosson Dam. It was a beautiful day and ideal for giving the MG Midget a run out. We made it up to the parking without incident [highly unusual for a nearly 40 year old car built by British Leyland] The problem was that the approach to the climb was plastered in snow and the higher we got the more snow. It became obvious we should employ the "discretion is better part of valour" dictum and bail back to the car. So this proved even more so that we needed to go somewhere else. Somwhere far a way. We headed for Cortina d'Amprezzo in the heart of the Dolomites. We stayed at the Albergo La Locanda del Cantoniere. This is an excellent location with very good food and wine . Yet not all was good because it is run by a women, who on a good day views her clientele as something that gets in the way of her daily routine. At best she is barely civil. Sunday 24th September. We awoke to the sound of lashing rain, which was on the verge of sleet. So much for driving 700 km to find better weather. We decided to venture out anyway. We reckoned we could at least try and climb a simple Via Ferrata in the rain. [David had never climbed one before.] We headed to the Cinque Torre area . As we drove up the road the rain turned to snow. by the time we arrived at the foot of the Via ferrata Averau we were in full winter scene. Nevertheless we climbed the via ferrata and made it to the summit of Torre Averau. All in all we felt quite a sense of achievement.
Dinner that evening was excellent , but Signorina just couldn't help herself, and announced very rudely she was suddenly closing the hotel the next day and we were not welcome any longer. Monday 25th. What a difference a day makes. Beautiful weather. We climbed the uber classic Torre Di Falzarego. It was only near the top that we were joined by a local Guide and his client whose route joined ours. After the climb we had to find somewhere to stay . We found a very good functional Hotel at lake Misurina : The Hotel Lavaredo. Tuesday 26th We walked up to the Rifugio Fonda-Savio Hutte. The welcome from Maria couldn't have been more diametrically opposed to that of two nights ago. We then walked the 15 minutes to the foot of Torre Wundt. We climbed the route in complete solitude. Quite fantastic. We returned to the hut and enjoyed a pleasant evening where the host didn't shout at us either.
Wednesday 27th. The morning was bright and clear, yet it was cold. We were in no particular hurry and were quite keen for the temperature to climb. Further , on the north facing approach slopes there was plenty of icy snow. The path from the Hut to the bottom of the wonderfully named Torre El Gobbo took about 40 mins. The climb was completely clear of snow apart from the final few meters to the summit block.
There was no wind and therefore despite it being cold we were fine. The two Rappells from the summit arent for the feint hearted.
From the foot of the climb we walked back to the car. We drove to Cortina where we enjoyed a beer in the square while enjoying a warm beautiful autumn afternoon. We stayed in the excellent Montana Hotel , bang slap in the center of the town opposite the Church. [David was relieved to learn that they shut the bells down at night.] Thursday 28th. We headed up the Falzarego pass to the Cinque Torre. This had been our intended destination when we first arrived in the Dolomites. Then we had ended up floundering around in the rain and snow, but not today , it was jaw droppingly beautiful, quiet and the perfect setting for us to attempt our last climb of the trip. We climbed the class via Guido 1V.
In the afternoon we drove back to Chamonix and arrived at 7.30pm.

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Climbing in contrasting regions of Italy

The weather around Chamonix had been unsettled , plus the backstory of conditions being shot to bits due to the heat wave of June, Charles Sherwood and I decided to head to the Dolomites. We had not been there together since 2011 when we managed to climb the Comici route on the North Face of the Cima Grande. One of the 6 classic alpine north faces . The weather in the Dolomites was also unsettled but I felt that if we choose slightly less ambitious routes we could get a lot of climbing under our belts. Monday 4th September . We drove from Chamonix to Cortina in about 7 hours. We stayed in the in the Hotel de la Poste bang slap in the center of the town. Tuesday 5th September. The Hotel thought itself as quite posh. So much so that at breakfast the Maître d'hôtel took issue with me turning up to breakfast in flip-flops. I was quite indignant. Especially when a bunch of middle America Americans turned up for breakfast making me look the height of sophistication. Anyway the weather forecast wasn't particularly good so Charles and I choose a climb that was straight forward with bad weather escape options yet it was indisputably a Dolomitic classic . Torre Di Falzarego 2500m first climbed by non other than Emilio Comici the original superstar of Dolomitic climbing was to be our choice. It is a brilliant rock climb but it is one of those routes that falls into the category of a climb which states . "No matter how badly you are climbing it is certain that there will be someone worse than you." It was busy. Wednesday 6th. Again the forecast was not good enough to attempt a route of massive commitment. We headed up to the Rifugio Fonda-Savio Hutte. We were greeted by women dressed in "Heidi kit." Plus they were all speaking German not Italian.Still a grudge toward the First world war which tore the region apart. After an indifferent cappuccino [ clearly not made by a true Italian] we headed out and climbed the Torre Wundt 2517 via the south face IV. The actual climbing wasn't the best but the arrival on the summit was impressive. We munched our picnic while having a debate as how to actually get off the top because it wasn't totally obvious. Five rappels later we were back on the path and moments later drinking beer back at the "Hutte." Thursday 7th. A rather late Hut breakfast at 7,30 and we were away.
We climbed the superbly named Il Gobbo 2560m. The smallest of the trio towers that also include Torre Leo and Torre del Diavolo. This was not our original plan. We climbed the wrong tower. Hind sight is a wonderful thing , but peering up at the towers through the mist it wasn't "blinding obvious which one was which. Yet it was fantastic in its own right and whats more it set up the possibility of climbing all three famous towers. Il Leo , Il Gobbo and Diavolo. We decided to stay with the Heidi women another night and try again the next day. Friday 8th. This was to be the climb of the week: Torre Del Diavolo. The Devils Tower. Immortalized by Hans Dulfer and his crazy step from Torre Leo to actually make the 1st ascent of Torre Diavolo. Our plan [which was yesterdays plan] was to do follow this iconic climb. The weather wasn't ideal , it was very cold and we suffered from numb fingers . It wasn't until I launched my self onto the 3rd pitch of Torre Leo that we ended up in the sun. The pitch is utterly spectacular and one of the best pitches I have climbed in a long while. It finished on the summit of Torre Leo. Now was the challenge of the step over to the Torre Diavolo. I climbed down to attempt to make the stemming move. It was very clear, pretty quickly that it wasn't going to happen. At least until I grew new legs. I gave up and climbed back up to Charles to have a rethink. I then rappelled off the top of the tower and jumped across the gap and lunged for for what I hoped was a good hold. Charles shouted a congratulatory well done. This was my que to find out that the hold wasn't fit for purpose and consequently for me to go spinning into the Void between the two towers. I tried again after giving myself an "I can do this" pep talk. I also suggested that Charles save the congratulations until I was at the belay and tied in. 2nd time lucky. I Climbed up to the anchor sorted the ropes and set myself up to help Charles across.
Next was a steep loose pitch. Followed by another steep loose pitch which gently overhung but ultimately ended on the summit of the Devils Tower. The descent route wasn't blindingly obvious. The obvious rappel point was apparently there as some sort of cruel joke. Fortunately we employed the "measure twice cut once" technique and double checked. Two 50 meter rappels put us at the foot of the route. An hour and a bit later we were back at the car. We headed up the Passo Falzarego and stayed in the Albergo La Locanda del Cantoniere. This was an excellent location other than it was run by a Schizophrenic nutcase. [Update in the next Blog...]
Saturday 9th. Weather was indifferent so we climbed some single pitch bolted climbs at Cinque Torre, then in the afternoon headed for the Messner Museum. It is quirky. For starters it is made as difficult to get to as possibly any museum in the world. Firstly it involves driving up this endless alpine pass where at the top you dump the car and then have the option of taking a shuttle bus/ taxi, up to the actual museum which is an old Fort. Anybody who doesn't opt to take the shuttle bus is in for a mind numbing walk up a track for at least 2 hours. ( Thank god we took the bus.] Basically the museum is a very inaccessible art gallery. Interesting, BUT, neither Charles nor I would be rushing back anytime soon.
We drove to Belluno for no particular reason other than it was on the way and looked interesting. We found a hotel which was a wedding venue extraordinaire because of its beautiful situation. Although perhaps not the night we choose to be there because there were now biblical quantities of rain. Sunday 10th Finale Liguria here we come. Five hours after leaving Belluno we were climbing in Finale complaining about being too hot. Sunday 11th There was the inevitable thrashing around in the trees trying to follow the instructions in the guide book on how to locate the crag but eventually we did. The climbing grades are quite stiff! We stayed in the ultimate B&B , with a world class view. We then eat dinner in the village below which was so beautiful it was like something out of a film set. Monday 13th After an impressive breakfast on the terrace presented by our host Kostas we went climbing on the crag nearest to the B&B. We returned late afternoon then in the evening walked up to the church on the hill. Conveniently the church also doubles as a restaurant with a view. In fact if there is a restaurant with a better view show me it.
Tuesday 14th Charles had to fly home. We drove from to Finale to Geneva airport in 4 hours.

Friday, September 01, 2017

Completing The Iconic Swiss Trilogy: The Jungfrau 4158m

About eleven years ago Chris Dovell and I climbed the Eiger and the Monch but we failed to climb the Jungfrau due to high winds and bad weather and therefore the classic Bernese Trilogy. Chris then got distracted and went off to climb the "Seven Summits." So now having got this out of his system he returned with his wife, Lia ,to try the Jungfrau one more time. We left the Monchjoch Hut at about 4.00am and made our way down the glacier. This was all quite straight forward .Yet getting from the glacier and established on the buttress was far from straight forward. There was a steep 40 meter traverse on hard black ice. Lia was having issues with her crampons and we lost time. In addition the previous days weather had been extremely hot and we had not had a good solid freeze. Thus conditions were deteriorating and I could see that things were running away from us. At the col we elected to turn around for safety's sake. We decided that we would try again the next day. Lia was who was still recovering from a major knee injury felt she would leave Chris and I to try alone. We headed back to the Monchjoch Hut. The Hut could be an okay place apart from the fact that it is run by a man who is defiantly in the wrong job. The guardian is the most unwelcoming , unhelpful, mean spirited git I have had the misfortune to cross in a very long time. 3.30Am We choose to have an early a breakfast as we could so that we would have the maximum chance of it being cold. In addition the previous day we had sussed out the direct descent from the col. It is rarely feasible , but when conditions are good it cuts the time of the route by half. There were some big deep "tower block" swallowing crevasses to negotiate but we sped up the route taking of advantage of our earlier start and the better freeze. We arrived at yesterdays high point some two hours quicker . From here the route goes out onto a steep face which has metal posts in place to belay around. We motored up the final section. But contrived to arrive on the summit in thick mist at 9.00am. It was only on the way down that we got the view back.
We were back at the Jungfraujoch Station about 2 hours from leaving the summit.

Friday, August 25, 2017

Big Classic Alpine Climbing : East Ridge of Beitschhorn 3934m

The Alpine Club Guide book states
Beitschhorn Viewed from almost any angle it is a magnificent sight, standing proud of all the adjacent peaks. It has three principal ridges, each of which is quite narrow … None of the routes are easy
… The East ridge is probably the hardest of them . Naturally this is the route that John Young and I decided to attempt. Yet before the attempt there is the herculean task of actually getting to the hut: The walk in from the highest road point is a formidable five and half hours. The longest walk in in the western alps. Fortunately it is also the most beautiful once you have negotiated the 1600 meter long tunnel which is a "new" Bise a water irrigation system. The original was built in the 1400's and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The route passes through fabulous terrain , plus a sort of summer village come hippy retreat, before eventually arriving at the Baltschiederklause Hut. [Not before time.] Having invested all this effort in actually getting to the hut we felt we should perhaps climb another peak while we were there and so choose the west ridge of the Jagihorn. The ridge was good and quite hard, with some thought provoking rock climbing. The descent was relatively short although probably a little longer day than we would have wanted considering the task we had set for the next day. Just before dinner I was invited to "Cocktails" by the Guardian . It was a chance to meet other Guides. No one else was planning to climb the Beitschhorn the next day. The Guardian gave us the weather forecast. It was stellar. 21st August 3.00am Breakfast . Then we were off up the path following the reflective markers. These ran out just when they would have been really useful but we still randomly found the toe of the glacier. We trudged up the dry glacier and after about an hour we had a debate about where we should leave the glacier and start on the lower part of the ridge. The options looked difficult although in the end the correct choice was made and it was a lot less difficult than it looked. Once we were established on the ridge things went well. It is very long , mostly on good rock and the route finding is on the whole straight forward. If in doubt stick to the ridge. After about 7 hours since leaving the hut we arrived on the summit feeling we had made a good account of ourselves.
The plan was then to traverse the mountain and descend to the Beitschhorn Hut. This is where the plan went awry. The cloud behind John in the photo was not as benign as the forecast had predicted . Soon we were enveloped in thick mist. Then the wind got up. It then started to rain. John's glasses steamed up and he could see his feet. Then the wind started to really blow. We now couldn't see further than an out stretched hand and the only way we could communicate was to yell into each others ears. In addition this side of the mountain was plastered in thick unconsolidated snow where as the east ridge , our route of ascent was dry. So strong was the wind that we could not climb down the ridge for fear of being blown off. The whole outing was turning into a bit of a challenge. Eventually we got forced into descending a steep couloir on the north side of the mountain just in an attempt to get out of the wind. We were making very slow progress because John could not see through his misted up glasses. It was now raining hard and we were getting very cold . Again we were forced onto some more unpleasant loose ground . Eventually I spotted an escape route and a rappel point. We rappelled onto the glacier out out of the mist. We were feeling mightily relieved even though the glacier was soft and there were lots of holes to navigate around it was a thousand times better than what we had had to endure. Eventually at about 9.00 pm we arrived back at the Baltschiederklause Hut. Drenched through. The first thing we did was get the Guardian to call the Beitschhorn Hut to inform them we would not be coming. Then we both sat down while the Hut Staff prepared lots of food for us and some large beers. A big day. The next day we awoke to a leisurely breakfast. The main topic of conversation was how could the weather forecast be so wrong? A local Swiss Guide who had been on an adjacent mountain told me that when the storm came in he called Geneva Airport to ask them what was happening in real time. Apparently they denied there was any bad weather!

Sunday, August 13, 2017

First Time on Crampons

The brief was to find somewhere high and spectacular where someone who had no previous alpine mountaineering experience could spend a week in an incredible environment. This was a challenge I accepted with Bob & Annie Taylor. Saturday 5th August. We met at the sports shop , Stamos Sports in Argentiere where Bob and Annie were kitted out with alpine climbing boots, crampons etc. We then headed up Les Grands Montets cable car for an initiation day. Annie had never worn crampons and the whole climbing thing was new to her. Meanwhile Bob was coming back to alpine climbing after a 30 year break. He was shocked that his new boots weighed virtually nothing while his boots of 30 years ago were more like deep sea diving boots. A lot of kit has changed in the last 30 years. We spent the morning learning the fundamentals of proper safe crampon technique. In the afternoon descended onto the glacier des Rognans. In the last 30 years it is not only the equipment has changed but the flip side is that so have the glaciers . It is utterly shocking to see the devastation reaked by global warming. What should have been a simple walk down a steepish snow slope turned into a baptism by fire of negotiating very intimidating open crevasses. What is the start of the ski piste in winter had become a very serious descent in the summer: The three of us headed down the "ski piste" before steeping over some eye wateringly huge crevasses. Next we turned left and climbed up the aiguille de Grands Montets eventually following the rocky ridge to the top. Sunday 6th August. We drove through the Mt Blanc tunnel down past Aosta then took the turning to Gressoney. We dumped the car at the road head at Staffel ,jumped on the cable car which conveniently put us at just over 3000 meters. We then walked and scambled to the Refugio Mantova for our first night at a very respectable 3500m. The sunset and view of Mt Blanc some 70 km was impressive: Monday 7th August. We left the Mantova at about 7.30 am , threaded our way through the the glacial rocks and then headed up the glacier negotiating some very photogenic crevasses. We made very good progress and were very happy to pass the magic 4000 meter mark. We continued on and reached the summit of Vincent Piramid 4200meters. We walked back down to the Gnifeti Hut slightly higher than the previous night. We sat on the terrace and Annie had the inspired idea of opening a bottle of Prosecco. It was all very fine , my only issue was it was just too hot. Tuesday 8th. Being too hot was not the issue the next day. The weather was not good for much as it snowed all day, Yet for us it gave us valuable further acclimatization which was going to be all important for aim of staying in the Margherita Hut. Wednesday 9th. The day started bright. The over night snow made everything look beautiful. We were careful not to be away too early so that other teams could break trail. Although we couldn't really afford to relaxed because the forecast was for storms in the afternoon. We enjoyed a wonderful ascent to the Margherita Hut at 4554meters , the highest building in Western Europe. We arrived at the Margherita at about 11.30am. Just before the weather turned bad . It started to snow and then the hut was hit by lightening knocking out the power for a while. Lightening strikes on the hut are a big deal. Recently according to the Hut Guardian someone had been fatally hit by lightening while taking a photo out of the window during a lightening storm. Although not fatal someone had also been hit by lightening which came through the air vent in the squatter toilet. Thursday 10th August. The last time I awoke in the Margerherita hut had been the Friday 24th June. The morning the Old , the Poor and the Stupid killed off the next generations future by voting for Brexit. [Why wouldn't you want your children to have the opportunities that a European passport provides?] Unfortunately I will always have this association with the Margherita. However on this morning I had the more practical issue of how we were going to get down in what was 30cm fresh snow and zero visibility. There was only one other Guide and party in the Hut that night. A very personable and very competent Grindlewald Guide named Patrick. We agreed to team up and work together. We didn't see much for the first couple of hours but once we got back to the Gnifeti Hut we were just below the cloud base. We stopped at the Mantova Hut for a cappuccino before sauntering back to the top of the lift syatem ending very good week.

Sunday, July 02, 2017

Uninspiring and really dangerous alpine conditions.

Another unwelcome heat wave hit the western Alps. The result is that all the snow has been stripped from the glaciers [there wasn't much anyway] The snow that glued all the rocks in place has melted, resulting in massive stone-fall issues. For example , the Gouter route on Mt Blanc is closed for business on the advice of the Préfet de la Haute Savoie: We are into new territory in the sense of alpine conditions in late June. Over the last 10 years the Alps have seen conditions similar to the present ones , BUT they have tended to be at the end of the season. Not at the beginning of the season. Anyway you can charge on blindly with your fixed agenda , pretending that the above letter is just scaremongering , or you can adapt your climbing aspirations. So bearing all this in mind Steve Woollard and I choose to climb long rock climbs which were made of solid rock and objectively safe. On Monday 26th June we drove up to the Emosson Dam and climbed the superb 10 pitch route the Acqua Concert. Tuesday 27th. The weather forecast suggested that this would be our last good day of weather for the week. We headed around to Verbier , drove through the town and then up through the Savoleyres pistes finally parking the Land Rover Defender at 2370 meters. From there it was half an hours walk to the Pierre Avoi where we climbed L'Arete. Once we arrived at the top Steve said that he thought, situationaly , it was one of the best climbs he had ever done. [Steve had done a lot of climbing!]
Wednesday 28th . The weather forecast was correct it rained and we agreed to take the day off. Thursday 29th The forecast was poor for Chamonix the temperature had plummeted . We had a good look at all the forecasts and it seemed that there was a possibility of clear weather in the morning , but only south of Aosta. So I scooped Steve up at 6.45am and we drove down to Arnad. We were at the foot of the route ,the famous and sought after, Bucce d"Arnancia. All was good apart from the fact that it was running with streaks of water which made it much much harder than we would have wanted it to be. At least the water in the cracks was warm. We walked off the top of the crag and stopped in the mystical village of Machaby at the Fort for a cappuccino. This proved to be a minor mistake because we got caught in the afternoon thunderstorm. Friday 30th . The overnight storms had put down unseasonable snow on the peaks around Chamonix. We drove through to Switzerland this time heading down the Rhone valley to Lavey Les Bains. Here there is the little known , but utterly spectacular pillar de la Pissechevre. Eight pitches of steep atmospheric climbing which culminates with the intimidatingly steep final pitch.